Prostate cancer stroma: an important factor in cancer growth and progression

Mallory or Masson trichrome staining in A) benign prostate hyperplasia (x400) and B) prostate cancer
Mallory or Masson trichrome staining in A) benign prostate hyperplasia (x400) and B) prostate cancer

Reactive stromal changes that occur in different human cancers might play a role in local tumor spreading and progression. Studies done on various human cancers have shown activated stromal cell phenotypes, modified extracellular matrix (ECM) composition, and increased microvessel density. Furthermore, they exhibit biological markers consistent with stroma at the site of wound repair. In prostate cancer, stroma is composed of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, endothelial cells and immune cells. Predominant cells in the tumorous stroma are, however, fibroblasts/myofibroblasts. They are responsible for the synthesis, deposition and remodeling of the ECM. Epithelial tumorous cells, in interaction with stromal cells and with the help of various molecules of ECM, create a microenvironment suitable for cancer cell proliferation, movement, and differentiation. In this review, we discussed the role of different stromal components in prostate cancer as well as their potential prognostic and therapeutic significance.

This review was published as:

Božo Krušlin, Monika Ulamec, Davor Tomas. Prostate cancer stroma: an important factor in cancer growth and progression. Bosn J Basic Med Sci. 2015 May; 15(2): 1–8. doi:  10.17305/bjbms.2015.449

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